Kirsten Schaefer / T 647.678.5528 / contact@kirstenschaefer.ca / © 2019 by Kirsten Schaefer

Courses Taught

I have been teaching in the School of Fashion since 2011. Courses taught, descriptions, and syllabi are listed below.

FSN 101 - Textiles I

 

Course Description

This course is an introduction to textiles and fibres: the general concepts of durability, comfort and care are related to the serviceability of fibres, yarns and fabric construction. In the laboratory time the students examine and compile a book of fabric samples which illustrate the concepts discussed in the lecture.

 

Learning outcomes

  1. Categorise the general characteristics of fibre families and list the unique characteristics. 

  2. Identify commonly used textiles fabrics by name. 

  3. Describe the general characteristics of yarns and selected fabric structures and explain the contribution each makes to fabric appearance and performance. 

  4. Predict fabric performances in terms of fibre characteristics, yarn structures, fabric structures and finishing processes. 

  5. Apply knowledge of textile characteristics, textile legislation and label information to the evaluation of textile products in terms of selection, care and specific end uses

  6. Evaluate fabric performance through simple testing. 

 

Weekly Contact: Lab:1 hr. Lecture: 2 hrs.

Number of Students: 200+

 

GPA Weight: 1.00

Course Count: 1.00

FFD 200

 

Course Description

This course is a continuation of the concepts introduced in FSN 101, Textiles I. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship of fibres, yarns, fabrics and finishes in defining the durability, comfort, care and serviceability of textiles. Processes ranging from traditional methods of manufacture to innovations in the production of high technology materials are discussed. Laboratory work involves applying these concepts to the fabrics used in apparel design courses. Students are required to compile a dictionary of standard fabrics.

 

Learning Outcomes

  1. Predict fabric performances in terms of fibre characteristics, yarn structures, fabric structures and finishing processes.

  2. Categorize the general characteristics of fibre families and list the unique characteristics of individual fibres.

  3. Describe the general characteristics of yarns and selected fabric structures and explain the contribution each type makes to fabric appearance and performance.

  4. Apply knowledge of textile characteristics, textile legislation and label information to the evaluation of textile products in terms of selection, care and specific end uses.

  5. Evaluate performance of fabrics through simple testing.

  6. Identify commonly used textiles fabrics by name.

  7. Use the knowledge acquired in the course to select the textile that best serves a specific end-use application - the textile that best matches the performance criteria established by the purchaser.

 

Weekly Contact: Lab:1 hr. Lecture: 2 hrs.

Number of Students: 80

 

GPA Weight: 1.00

Course Count: 1.00

FSN 120

 

Course Description

Basic concepts and theories of apparel design and production development are introduced. Design principles are examined through the typology of garment styles and silhouettes, and executed through patternmaking exercises and construction assignments.  Professional methods and equipment are utilized.

 

Learning Outcomes 

  1. Develop industrial pattern drafting skills through the manipulation of basic bodice, skirt and sleeve blocks.

  2. Develop apparel construction skills using industrial irons and straight stitch machines.  A number of samples will be constructed.

  3. Develop technical design skills and an understanding of garment terminology.

  4. Explore and develop their creativity through the design process.

 

Weekly Contact: Lab: 4 hrs.

Number of Students: 27

 

GPA Weight: 1.00

Course Count: 1.00

FSN 220

 

Course Description

Original designs are developed and realized through design concept research and the close integration of contextual themes, textiles, colour, styling and fit. Critical analysis of completed garments is made with reference to design, consumer needs and marketability.

 

Learning Outcomes                    

  1. Develop an understanding of the apparel design process, from ideation sketch through to the final garment.

  2. Design a women’s dress suitable for daywear. Students will research a retail store and market, develop inspiration boards and/or visual depictions of their theme, and create ideation sketches based on their inspiration and research. Students evaluate and choose fabrics, draft patterns, construct and fit muslins, create technicals and cost sheets and critically analyze the design and construction of the final prototype.

  3. Develop creative problem-solving skills.

 

Weekly Contact: Lab: 3 hrs.

Number of Students: 27

GPA Weight: 1.00

Course Count: 1.00

FSN 707

 

Course Description

Whether writing a paper or designing a collection, research is integral to the design process. This course examines a variety of research methods relevant to the interdisciplinary study of fashion. Social Science, Humanities, and Arts-Based approaches will be covered in order to understand the complexity and diversity of fashion research in both academic and professional contexts. Social Science methods may cover survey research, case studies, grounded theory, as well as phenomenological and ethnographic approaches. Humanities methods may include literature reviews, archival and object-based research as well as discourse analysis in relation to social theory. A variety of approaches in creative practice and arts-based research will also be discussed. 

 

Learning Outcomes

- Create a glossary of terms related to design research. 

- Know how to find and assess different types of research materials and sources in the field of fashion. 

- Understand research methodologies and methods used in fashion. 

- Formulate a research question and design a research project. 

- Write a research proposal, using correct style and format. 

- Be aware of the ethical principles of research, ethical challenges and approval processes 

 

Weekly Contact: Lecture: 2 hrs. Tutorial: 1hr.

Number of Students: 32

 

GPA Weight: 1.00

Course Count: 1.00

Fashion Innovation Studio - Summer Workshop Series

 

A note on this course: I taught this course during the summer of 2015 as a volunteer instructor to share the knowledge and skills I had gained at a recent conference. This course is not part of the regular undergraduate curriculum. I hope to offer it again in the future.

 

Course Description 

This studio workshop series will provide participants with a creative learning environment to investigate different design approaches and techniques. Each two-hour workshop will briefly introduce a new theme concept for designers to explore as part of a creative discovery process. Participants will be encouraged to use the studio time to create a garment prototype (or partial prototype) each week, using the theme concepts as a guide. By the end of the series, participants will have expanded their capacity for creative design thinking and will be equipped to pursue further design practice using approaches they developed in the workshop. Participants are required to bring their own muslin (3-5m per workshop), pins, scissors, rulers, paper, and other drafting supplies. This class will not involve machine sewing (if participants

wish to sew up their garment prototypes, they are encouraged to do so at home).

 

Prerequisite: No previous training required. Draping experience is helpful.

 

Learning Outcomes

  1. Increase knowledge of different fabric manipulation techniques

  2. Increase confidence in using different shapes, folds, and drapes in design practice

 

Weekly Contact: Studio: 2 hrs.

Number of Students: 10

GPA Weight: N/A

Course Count: N/A